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20130318
20130326
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KQED (PBS) 25
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the latest technology and libraries and laboratories that students need and the technology that students need to use-- to learn today. >> brown: another question i've heard is why all at once? i mean, this is-- it becomes a very disruptive thing when you do so many schools at one time. is the city prepared for this when you're going to have thousands of people, many buildings affected? >> well, we've been doing this a little bit at a time for last decade, frankly, and we're-- frankly, we're weary of having to go through this every single europe in chicago. every spring is school closing season. we want to be done with this business now, get it done with, right size of district. frankly, it's something that should have been done-- this is a problem that has been a decade-long independent making, should have been addressed before the current school board and school management at cps, is determined to not ignore those issues. i think frankly we would be disappointed in all of us if we didn't recognize this issue and address it and not be satisfied with the status quo and let's go on to the next
efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. > that's why we're here. >> additional funding is also provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs . ations from viewers like you corporate funding is also provide bid prudential. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. it took him four years to get there, but when barack obama arrived in israel for the first time as president this week, he had what he called his homework .n hand on the list, healing a political rift with prime minister benjamin netanyahu, winning over a skeptical and gently c, restarting the moribund middle east peace talks in part by appealing to israelis to see it from the palestinian point of iew. >> put yourself in their shoes. look at the world through their eyes. just as israelis built a state in their homeland, palestinians have a right to be a free people in their own land. gw
's technology. but right now the stock markets are betting on what the future of the world looks like in a year and-a-half and by the way, they don't really care so much about unemployment per se. unemployment will get better but that's not the fundamental issue it's about profits. and companies are figuring out clever ways to profit despite some of these other problems in the economy. >> rose: that an unjustified optimism do you think, simon. >> charlie i think it's all about the federal reserve which is ironic of course because the federal reserve messed up on pretty much over domain since 2007. but now the fed is more powerful than it's ever been in it's 100 year history and it's with regard to the asset prices and the unemployment picture and to the extent they continue to press on various or back away from various dimensions of quantitative easing. the fed is driving asset prices, it's having this huge influence over the economy and the seven people on the board of governors of the federal reserve have inordinate influence over what's happening. and it is striking and amazing in this cont
technologies am and the time was coming where we needed to spend less time building new things. and more time making the things we had built work well. and i was more interested in kind of building new things. and ultimately i think that i wasn't interested in the product my self. i think it is an amazing product, there are amazing people there. and i had hired people with experience in quantitative social science that i thought were much more motivated by the problem demand than i was. and i needed to just kind of clear a way for those people who were going to do a better job analyzing that data than i could. >> rose: your quote, the best minds of my generation think how they can make people click ads that sucks. >> you know, on my tombstone i think. >> rose: actually vance who wrote in bloomberg business week wrote about you said you might say hammerbacher is a conscientious objecter to the advance business of marketing-driven culture that now permeates tech and that's why he quit what he was doing. >> i wouldn't say that i quit because i was a conscientious objecter to the business model.
, as well as the actual technological designs that makes people want to be southern californians. >> reporter: southern californians like surfer c.d. kinley. >> got some vans. typical vans, socks, all of the rage right now. just cooler than white socks in general. >> reporter: speaking of cooler, is it cooler to ride an american-made surfboard, or an imported surfboard, say, from china? >> well, just to me personally, supporting a brand that's from california like infinity, who's been making boards here for 50 years, that's a lot cooler for me. >> reporter: and at least around here, that's how a lot of the cowabunga crowd still feels and still spends its money. >> brown: international trade and a call for reduced barriers was on the agenda this week, as treasury secretary jack lew met with top chinese leaders in beijing. no word yet if surfboards came up. >> sreenivasan: now, our series on broadband and how it's changing our habits, our work, our communities. tonight, we focus on why some cities are opting for even faster access and whether it will make sense for other places to
with the decisions that are made in a job, what you're producing, what technology's being used, what the health conditions of your workplace are, what's done with the fruits of your labor, literally whether your factor or your office continues, since you have to live with those decisions you ought to participate, the basic idea of democracy. so i like the idea of cooperative enterprises because it fulfills my value commitment to democracy. whereas a capitalist enterprise doesn't because it keeps all the decision making in a tiny minority. we all who go to work have to live with their decisions, but we don't articipate in them, not even to speak of the community that has to live with the decisions. but the second reason is i see concrete results coming from an enterprise that was run by the workers collectively, and let me give you a few examples. first, most of us believe that if the workers themselves made a decision that they would close the enterprise and move it to china, i don't think so. i think that the whole running away of enterprises out of the united states was made possible because
sreenivasan continues our series on broadband technology with a look at a new digital divide over how high-speed access and mobile devices are being used. >> woodruff: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: it was a day of diplomacy for president obama in the middle east. he promised jordan he would seek $200 million in much-needed help to cope with an influx
the earnings report. we think the software portion of the technology cycle is sound. what is going on with oracle from a fundamental standpoint is fine as well. the issue exclusively was the fact that they missed on revenues. and the problem was that a lot of the sales that management expected to hit in the third quarter slipped into the fourth quarter. we think that they are going to get back on strength by the end of the fourth quarter. we are expecting a good quarter. as we look over the next year we think the stock is still going to trade into the upper 30s. we thought that was an atrackive entry spot. >> great information. any disclosures to make? >> we own all of the three stocks in our funds. >> phil orlando. >>> and still ahead the fallout from the government's budget cuts could be coming to an airport near you. first take a look at how the international markets closed out the day. >>> today is world water day but you wouldn't know that in many parts of the u.s. the drought in the nation's mid section is entering its third year and more hotter and drier weather is expected
and painful. most technological advances do not come out of the party apparatus. they come out as howard dean had social networking, and barack obama took that to different levels in 2012. >> rand paul had a speech on immigration that even marco rubio praised. >> rand paul is, to me, representing what republicans ought to be doing, and not what priebus is talking about. paul called the harvard university business school and asked for an opportunity to talk to the students about the future of the republican party and the african-american community on april 10. he is not waiting to get the nomination and then put together the outreach programs. he is doing it now. he is doing this on a number of fronts. this is what the republican party has to do. not just worry about the mechanics of the campaign. >> i am all for idealizing, idolizing rand paul. this is a fella who has re- created himself. this is the new rand paul. when he ran for senate three years ago, what did he run on? he ran on an electrical wire across the southern border, helicopters and the repeal of birthright citizenship. now is a
technology all gained at the open before drifting down and then closed fractionally higher just as did the dow today. deals drove some stocks today. amerisource signed a deal with wall green. shares up 3.5%. separately walgreens reported better than expected earnings. they will not renew its contract with the drug whole saler cardinal health and that sent that stock down more than 8%. >>> carnival cruise lines has canceled a dozen sailings, ten from texas to mexico, two in european waters, and that's to improve two ships' emergency power and safety systems. that's what the company said. the stock fell 2% to $33. year-to-date carnival is down more than 9%. >>> well a downward dog kind of day for lulu lemon. shared tumbled as it pulled a batch of yoga pants from store shelves because thaiths too sheer. the issue will have a significant impact the company said and reduce sales by about 3% in the current quarter. the stock was downgraded to neutral from a buy. lulu lemon shares closed at $54 a share down almost 3%. >>> solid earnings tonight from adobe systems after the bell its first quar
. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and na
.o.p. spent $10 million toward new minority outreach efforts and even more on technology and building an improved voter database. embrace comprehensive immigration reforms, and restructure its presidential nominating process to reduce the number of primary debates and settle on a nominee earlier in the year. former florida governor jeb bush used last week's conservative political action conference to foreshadow many of the conclusions contained in today's report. >> we must move beyond the divisive and extraneous issues that currently define the public debate. never again, never again can the republican party simply ride off... write off entire segments of our society because we assume our principles have limited appeal. they have broad appeal. >> ifill: but senator marco rubio told the conservative meeting that the party should not embrace change for its own sake. >> and so our challenge is to create an agenda applying our principles. our principles, they still work. applying our time-tested principles to the challenges of today. >> ifill: yet the biggest hit at last week's conferenc
in preventing iran from developing nuclear technology. i think it should assuage israelis who are concerned about this issue i wonder why-- and this seems to be part of the conversation in washington-- that israelis need an american president to show some deep emotional attachment to affirm their rootedness to israel. this is a strong society, a country that has done remarkable things over the course of its 65-year history. i'm not sure why an american president -- only four of the last ten or 11 presidents have gone to israel, why this is so important. the other thing that aaron said that let me disagree slightly with is barack obama doesn't want to be the first president to let the two-state solution slip away. i'm not sure that the two-state solution makes sense other than in washington policy discussions about the peace process. if you just look at what has been happening in israel, in jerusalem with regard to settlement construction in jerusalem around jerusalem in the west bank the structure of this conflict in which the israelis can't possibly give the palestinians what they require
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >>> this is "nightly business report" with tyler mathisen and susie gharib. >> the drama playing out in the mediterranean takes markets on a ride. worldwide the parliament in cyprus rejects a plan to tax its bank depositors. the euro falls to its lowest level since november. >>> ben bernanke and the fed get down to business. what should we expect after its two-day meeting ends tomorrow? we'll ask former federal reserve governor randy crosser in. >> and what does the ceo of one of the world's iconic brands think of the economy and the american consumer? susie sits down with the top man at coca-cola. all that and more coming up right now on "nbr." good evening and welcome to our public te
provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, union bank, and fidelity investments. >> this is what a personal economy looks like. as life changes, fidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your plan as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help fine-tune your personal economy. fidelity investments -- turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specia
started his own tech services company storm technologies during the boom years, is worried about a talent shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing potatoes for generations. irish potato consumption waned during the economic boom as irish tastes changed. the youngest generation of this family look for new markets and started a new business. gourmet potato chips called crisps here, kettled in small batches. after 18 months, they're selling in europe, asia, and to high-
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)